IN RESPONSE Exhibit Walkthroughs

We are in the middle or our transition between exhibits here at the Bryan Oliver Gallery, and the coming weeks will see a host of blog posts put together by our Senior Art and Design majors. In the meantime, enjoy these short video walkthroughs of the previous exhibit, IN RESPONSE: Jenny Hyde, Roin Morigeau and Dan McCann.

This first video looks at the work of Jenny Hyde who is a multi-disciplinary artist from Washington State. Her work explores cultural geography through study of landscape and the body.  She works with sound, video, digital print and multi-media installation.Jenny currently teaches digital art at Eastern Washington University in Cheney, WA. She holds an MFA in Integrated Electronic Art from Alfred University (2006) and BFA with a focus in painting from Cornish College of the Arts (1998). Her work has been part of media festivals and exhibitions nationally and abroad. She has been recognized with awards such as the Artist Trust Fellowship and the Faculty Scholarly & Creative Excellence Award at EWU. In addition to making and exhibiting work, she is an active advocate for the arts in Spokane. 

Her Artist Statement reads:

My work involves many processes, from traditional to experimental, but always engages the use of digital technology. Though my work varies in medium and content, there is always a connection to American history, physicality and an emphasis on everyday lives. These works demonstrate a multidisciplinary digital arts practice and an interest in the relationships between culture and place (cultural geography).

All-Americanlooks at the artifact of guns, specifically American made rifles and shotguns. The interest in this subject comes from the personal experience of growing up in a household with a gun. A local gun shop gave me permission to document different rifles with a photo scanner. This was done onsite in the gun shop. At first, I was only interested in the .22 caliber rifles, as a way of looking at the gun as a household tool, as it is often understood to be in most rural American homes. However, once the process started, all rifles became a point of interest – old shotguns along with newer manufactured models. The finished images question the cultural identity of Americans – in particular the romanticized depiction of isolation or “independence.” 

My newest work is a direct response to the two most significant factors in our lives in this moment, the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement. Originally these digital photomontages were a playful response to the isolation of lock down and the visual renderings of the corona virus that began to circulate in the media. However, the rise of the BLM movement and the resulting examination of systemic racism and White Supremist Culture quickly shifted my focus. I began to see these works differently – as a way to examine or question the idea of infection or threat. Can white Americans be cured of the longer, more damaging and deadly pandemic of racism? I am posing this question with an examination of myself and family members, by presenting individual “infections” that I have identified that have resulted in privilege or setbacks.

The next couple of videos focus on the work of Roin Morigeau and Dan McCann. Roin (b. Oct 24, 1984) is an interdisciplinary artist using drawing, painting, poetry, digital collage and sculpture to explore the dichotomy between matriarchal and patriarchal space. Roin was nominated for the 2019 Centrum Emerging Artist Residency Program and has shown in numerous shows and exhibitions regionally including King St. Station at Seattle Office of Arts + Culture, Terrain Gallery, and the Chase Gallery at Spokane City Hall. Roin is a descendant of the Flathead Salish Tribe of Montana and lives in occupied Spokane territories where they were raised. 

Dan has worked and exhibited in the fine arts field for 30 years. His work uses a variety of materials tailored to the intent and content of the art. Being self-taught, he began in the early 70s working with glass, designing and building stained glass windows and fused glass, and creating a line of fused glass jewelry. The move into mixed media began in the early 90s when he felt his glass work began to stagnate. He started using arbitrary objects to create order with a visual impact, establishing a relationship with the objects Arbitrary Order.

This is what Roin and Dan had to say about this body of work:

The human body is a constrained palette consisting of 11 elements: oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, sodium, chlorine, and magnesium. All 11 are essential to human life. What occurs when we add or subtract one of these life giving ingredients is a new and different body, a new life. For ​IN RESPONSE, ​local artists Roin Morigeau and Dan McCann have worked collaboratively to create a new body. Using items solely found from McCann’s 30 years of studio archives and working independent of each other for the past five months in quarantine, Morigeau and McCann present ​IN RESPONSE​ as a joint experiment in creative isolation. 

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